Category Archives: Unemployment

U-3 And U-6 Unemployment Rate Long-Term Reference Charts As Of April 4, 2014

Shortly after each monthly employment report I have been posting a continual series titled “3 Critical Unemployment Charts.”

Of course, there are many other employment charts that can be displayed as well.

For reference purposes, below are the U-3 and U-6 Unemployment Rate charts from a long-term historical perspective.  Both charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  The U-3 measure is what is commonly referred to as the official unemployment rate; whereas the U-6 rate is officially (per Bureau of Labor Statistics) defined as:

Total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force

Of note, many economic observers use the U-6 rate as a (closer) proxy of the actual unemployment rate rather than that depicted by the U-3 measure.

Here is the U-3 chart, currently showing a 6.7% unemployment rate:

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 4-4-14)

unemployment rate

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilian Unemployment Rate [UNRATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed April 4, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UNRATE

-

Here is the U-6 chart, currently showing a 12.7% unemployment rate:

U-6

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons  [U6RATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed April 4, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/U6RATE

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1872.55 as this post is written

3 Critical Unemployment Charts – April 2014

As I have commented previously, as in the October 6, 2009 post (“A Note About Unemployment Statistics”), in my opinion the official methodologies used to measure the various job loss and unemployment statistics do not provide an accurate depiction; they serve to understate the severity of unemployment.

However, even if one chooses to look at the official statistics, the following charts provide an interesting (and disconcerting) long-term perspective of certain aspects of the officially-stated unemployment situation.

The first two charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  Here is the Median Duration of Unemployment (current value = 16.3 weeks) :

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 4-4-14)

UEMPMED

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Median Duration of Unemployment [UEMPMED] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed April 4, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMPMED

-

Here is the chart for Unemployed 27 Weeks and Over (current value =  3.739 million) :

unemployed 27 weeks and over

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilians Unemployed for 27 Weeks and Over [UEMP27OV] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed April 4, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMP27OV

-

Lastly, a chart from the CalculatedRisk.com site, from the April 4, 2014 post titled “March Employment Report:  192,000 Jobs, 6.7% Unemployment Rate.”  This shows the employment situation vs. that of previous recessions, as shown:

Employment during recessions

-

As depicted by these charts, our unemployment problem is severe.  Unfortunately, there do not appear to be any “easy” solutions.

On April 24, 2012 I wrote a five-part blog post titled “The Unemployment Situation Facing The United States”, which discusses various problematical issues concerning the present and future employment situation.

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1890.67 as this post is written

U-3 And U-6 Unemployment Rate Long-Term Reference Charts As Of March 7, 2014

Shortly after each monthly employment report I have been posting a continual series titled “3 Critical Unemployment Charts.”

Of course, there are many other employment charts that can be displayed as well.

For reference purposes, below are the U-3 and U-6 Unemployment Rate charts from a long-term historical perspective.  Both charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  The U-3 measure is what is commonly referred to as the official unemployment rate; whereas the U-6 rate is officially (per Bureau of Labor Statistics) defined as:

Total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force

Of note, many economic observers use the U-6 rate as a (closer) proxy of the actual unemployment rate rather than that depicted by the U-3 measure.

Here is the U-3 chart, currently showing a 6.7% unemployment rate:

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 3-7-14)

U-3 Rate

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilian Unemployment Rate [UNRATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed March 7, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UNRATE

-

Here is the U-6 chart, currently showing a 12.6% unemployment rate:

U-6 Rate

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons  [U6RATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed March 7, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/U6RATE

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1880.91 as this post is written

3 Critical Unemployment Charts – March 2014

As I have commented previously, as in the October 6, 2009 post (“A Note About Unemployment Statistics”), in my opinion the official methodologies used to measure the various job loss and unemployment statistics do not provide an accurate depiction; they serve to understate the severity of unemployment.

However, even if one chooses to look at the official statistics, the following charts provide an interesting (and disconcerting) long-term perspective of certain aspects of the officially-stated unemployment situation.

The first two charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  Here is the Median Duration of Unemployment (current value = 16.4 weeks) :

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 3-7-14)

median duration of unemployment

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Median Duration of Unemployment [UEMPMED] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed March 7, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMPMED

-

Here is the chart for Unemployed 27 Weeks and Over (current value =  3.849 million) :

unemployed 27 weeks and over

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilians Unemployed for 27 Weeks and Over [UEMP27OV] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed March 7, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMP27OV

-

Lastly, a chart from the CalculatedRisk.com site, from the March 7 post titled “February Employment Report:  175,000 Jobs, 6.7% Unemployment Rate.”  This shows the employment situation vs. that of previous recessions, as shown:

CR 3-7-14 - EmployRecFeb2014

-

As depicted by these charts, our unemployment problem is severe.  Unfortunately, there do not appear to be any “easy” solutions.

On April 24, 2012 I wrote a five-part blog post titled “The Unemployment Situation Facing The United States”, which discusses various problematical issues concerning the present and future employment situation.

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1877.03 as this post is written

U-3 And U-6 Unemployment Rate Long-Term Reference Charts As Of February 7, 2014

Shortly after each monthly employment report I have been posting a continual series titled “3 Critical Unemployment Charts.”

Of course, there are many other employment charts that can be displayed as well.

For reference purposes, below are the U-3 and U-6 Unemployment Rate charts from a long-term historical perspective.  Both charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  The U-3 measure is what is commonly referred to as the official unemployment rate; whereas the U-6 rate is officially (per Bureau of Labor Statistics) defined as:

Total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force

Of note, many economic observers use the U-6 rate as a (closer) proxy of the actual unemployment rate rather than that depicted by the U-3 measure.

Here is the U-3 chart, currently showing a 6.6% unemployment rate:

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 2-7-14)

UNRATE_2-7-14 6.6 percent

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilian Unemployment Rate [UNRATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed February 7, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UNRATE

-

Here is the U-6 chart, currently showing a 12.7% unemployment rate:

U6RATE_2-7-14 12.7 percent

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons  [U6RATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed February 7, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/U6RATE

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1780.87 as this post is written

3 Critical Unemployment Charts – February 2014

As I have commented previously, as in the October 6, 2009 post (“A Note About Unemployment Statistics”), in my opinion the official methodologies used to measure the various job loss and unemployment statistics do not provide an accurate depiction; they serve to understate the severity of unemployment.

However, even if one chooses to look at the official statistics, the following charts provide an interesting (and disconcerting) long-term perspective of certain aspects of the officially-stated unemployment situation.

The first two charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  Here is the Median Duration of Unemployment (current value = 16.0 weeks) :

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 2-7-14)

UEMPMED_2-7-14 16.0 weeks

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Median Duration of Unemployment [UEMPMED] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed February 7, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMPMED

-

Here is the chart for Unemployed 27 Weeks and Over (current value =  3.646 million) :

UEMP27OV_2-7-14 3646

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilians Unemployed for 27 Weeks and Over [UEMP27OV] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed February 7, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMP27OV

-

Lastly, a chart from the CalculatedRisk.com site, from the February 7 post titled “January Employment Report:  113,000 Jobs, 6.6% Unemployment Rate.”  This shows the employment situation vs. that of previous recessions, as shown:

CR 2-7-14 - EmployRecJan2014

-

As depicted by these charts, our unemployment problem is severe.  Unfortunately, there do not appear to be any “easy” solutions.

On April 24, 2012 I wrote a five-part blog post titled “The Unemployment Situation Facing The United States”, which discusses various problematical issues concerning the present and future employment situation.

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1786.83 as this post is written

U-3 And U-6 Unemployment Rate Long-Term Reference Charts As Of January 10, 2014

Shortly after each monthly employment report I have been posting a continual series titled “3 Critical Unemployment Charts.”

Of course, there are many other employment charts that can be displayed as well.

For reference purposes, below are the U-3 and U-6 Unemployment Rate charts from a long-term historical perspective.  Both charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  The U-3 measure is what is commonly referred to as the official unemployment rate; whereas the U-6 rate is officially (per Bureau of Labor Statistics) defined as:

Total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force

Of note, many economic observers use the U-6 rate as a (closer) proxy of the actual unemployment rate rather than that depicted by the U-3 measure.

Here is the U-3 chart, currently showing a 6.7% unemployment rate:

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 1-10-14)

UNRATE_1-10-14 6.7 percent

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilian Unemployment Rate [UNRATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed January 10, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UNRATE

-

Here is the U-6 chart, currently showing a 13.1% unemployment rate:

U6RATE_1-10-14 13.1 percent

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons  [U6RATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed January 10, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/U6RATE

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1834.86 as this post is written

3 Critical Unemployment Charts – January 2014

As I have commented previously, as in the October 6, 2009 post (“A Note About Unemployment Statistics”), in my opinion the official methodologies used to measure the various job loss and unemployment statistics do not provide an accurate depiction; they serve to understate the severity of unemployment.

However, even if one chooses to look at the official statistics, the following charts provide an interesting (and disconcerting) long-term perspective of certain aspects of the officially-stated unemployment situation.

The first two charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  Here is the Median Duration of Unemployment (current value = 17.1 weeks) :

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 1-10-14)

UEMPMED_1-10-14 17.1 weeks

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Median Duration of Unemployment [UEMPMED] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed January 10, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMPMED

-

Here is the chart for Unemployed 27 Weeks and Over (current value =  3.878 million) :

UEMP27OV_1-10-14 3878

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilians Unemployed for 27 Weeks and Over [UEMP27OV] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed January 10, 2014;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMP27OV

-

Lastly, a chart from the CalculatedRisk.com site, from the January 10 post titled “December Employment Report:  74,000 Jobs, 6.7% Unemployment Rate.”  This shows the employment situation vs. that of previous recessions, as shown:

CR 1-10-14 - EmployRecDec2013

-

As depicted by these charts, our unemployment problem is severe.  Unfortunately, there do not appear to be any “easy” solutions.

On April 24, 2012 I wrote a five-part blog post titled “The Unemployment Situation Facing The United States”, which discusses various problematical issues concerning the present and future employment situation.

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1836.83 as this post is written

U-3 And U-6 Unemployment Rate Long-Term Reference Charts As Of December 6, 2013

Shortly after each monthly employment report I have been posting a continual series titled “3 Critical Unemployment Charts.”

Of course, there are many other employment charts that can be displayed as well.

For reference purposes, below are the U-3 and U-6 Unemployment Rate charts from a long-term historical perspective.  Both charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  The U-3 measure is what is commonly referred to as the official unemployment rate; whereas the U-6 rate is officially (per Bureau of Labor Statistics) defined as:

Total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force

Of note, many economic observers use the U-6 rate as a (closer) proxy of the actual unemployment rate rather than that depicted by the U-3 measure.

Here is the U-3 chart, currently showing a 7.0% unemployment rate:

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 12-6-13)

UNRATE_12-6-13 7.0 percent

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilian Unemployment Rate [UNRATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed December 6, 2013;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UNRATE

-

Here is the U-6 chart, currently showing a 13.2% unemployment rate:

U6RATE_12-6-13 13.2 percent

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons  [U6RATE] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed December 6, 2013;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/U6RATE

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1800.16 as this post is written

3 Critical Unemployment Charts – December 2013

As I have commented previously, as in the October 6, 2009 post (“A Note About Unemployment Statistics”), in my opinion the official methodologies used to measure the various job loss and unemployment statistics do not provide an accurate depiction; they serve to understate the severity of unemployment.

However, even if one chooses to look at the official statistics, the following charts provide an interesting (and disconcerting) long-term perspective of certain aspects of the officially-stated unemployment situation.

The first two charts are from the St. Louis Fed site.  Here is the Median Duration of Unemployment (current value = 17.0 weeks) :

(click on charts to enlarge images)(charts updated as of 12-6-13)

UEMPMED_12-6-13 17.0 weeks

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Median Duration of Unemployment [UEMPMED] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed December 6, 2013;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMPMED

-

Here is the chart for Unemployed 27 Weeks and Over (current value =  4.066 million) :

UEMP27OV_12-6-13 4066

Data Source: FRED, Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis: Civilians Unemployed for 27 Weeks and Over [UEMP27OV] ; U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics; accessed December 6, 2013;

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/UEMP27OV

-

Lastly, a chart from the CalculatedRisk.com site, from the December 6 post titled “November Employment Report:  203,000 Jobs, 7.0% Unemployment Rate.”  This shows the employment situation vs. that of previous recessions, as shown:

CR 12-6-13 - EmployRecNov2013

-

As depicted by these charts, our unemployment problem is severe.  Unfortunately, there do not appear to be any “easy” solutions.

On April 24, 2012 I wrote a five-part blog post titled “The Unemployment Situation Facing The United States”, which discusses various problematical issues concerning the present and future employment situation.

_____

The Special Note summarizes my overall thoughts about our economic situation

SPX at 1785.03 as this post is written